Greg Doyel, I forgot what a tool he is

Seymore Cox

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 12, 2008
Messages
9,068
Reaction score
162
http://www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/story/9153113
The NCAA's look into the Oklahoma basketball program has every element of the modern-day NCAA investigation, including the 21st century smoking gun: a phone bill.

The NCAA alleges the OU coaching staff made more than 550 impermissible calls to recruits from April 2000 to September 2004. Oklahoma issued self-imposed sanctions, including two years of probation and a three-scholarship reduction.


The Sooners have to answer to the Infractions Committee in April. (Getty Images)
With the NCAA chillingly not accepting those sanctions as being firm enough, Oklahoma faces the Infractions Committee in April.

Meanwhile, CBS SportsLine.com's investigation shows this case looks like so many others. The usual cast of characters:

The youth program: CBS SportsLine.com has learned that the NCAA's look into Oklahoma didn't begin in May 2004, as has been widely reported, but actually much earlier. As early as 2002, the NCAA was investigating the link between the Sooners and the region's most prominent club program, Athletes First, whose alumni include Duke's Shelden Williams, New Mexico's J.R. Giddens and OU recruits Kevin Bookout, De'Angelo Alexander, David Godbold, Taylor Griffin and Keith Clark. The NCAA questioned Athletes First players (and parents) in 2002, according to one person who was questioned, asking specifically about their relationship with then-OU assistant Ray Lopes. Athletes First coach Gary Vick told CBS SportsLine.com: "They talked to every single player on that team. They were asking in regards to myself, whether I was doing anything irregular. But I don't do that."

The exhibition team: Athletes First was founded in 1998 in conjunction with a traveling exhibition team that played Division I programs -- the very conflict of interest the NCAA legislated out of college basketball two years ago. The exhibition team in question was created in the late 1970s under the name Marathon Oil, then became known as Conoco Oil, then changed its name to Athletes First. Vick had been the exhibition coach since its Marathon Oil days, but in the late 1990s he began looking for elite high school players to create a club program. While Vick says the creation of the Athletes First club program had nothing to do with his exhibition team, CBS SportsLine.com spoke with the area talent scout who steered Vick toward Bookout, Alexander and Williams. "He told me he needed players," the scout said of Vick. "Coaches were telling him they couldn't play his (exhibition) team if he didn't have players they could recruit." Vick's exhibition team played Oklahoma annually from 2001-03 -- when the Sooners were getting commitments from Bookout, Alexander, Godbold and Griffin of Athletes First. The booster: Athletes First was founded by J. Calvin Johnson of Oklahoma City, a 1984 graduate of the OU College of Medicine. Sources describe Johnson -- who was unavailable for comment despite multiple attempts by CBS SportsLine.com -- as an OU basketball booster. Vick says Johnson started Athletes First to prepare in-state players for elite competition, but says Johnson doesn't run the club's day-to-day operations. "I do," Vick said. "And we don't steer players to Oklahoma. If a kid wants to go to Oklahoma State -- like (OSU recruit) Obi Muonelo -- that's great."

The misdirection: The spin out of OU is that the Sooners were ensnared in the NCAA web that cost Lopes his job at Fresno State. Lopes resigned from Fresno State in March 2005 after it was discovered that he and his staff had made more than 400 impermissible phone calls to recruits from April 2002 to November 2004. Several sources, however, say the opposite is true: Lopes was dragged down by the NCAA's look into Oklahoma -- not vice versa. The NCAA's recent looks into Oklahoma -- first the Athletes First connection, then in 2004 with the phone calls -- were triggered by several rivals in the Big 12 who reported the Sooners to the NCAA.

The smoking gun: Lopes' attorney, Toby Baldwin, says the NCAA's notice of allegations makes no reference to Athletes First. In other words, if there was any wrongdoing between Oklahoma and Athletes First, the NCAA hasn't found it. However, the phone calls are another matter -- as usual. Phone bills have become the NCAA's easiest way to nail a program. In recent years, massive NCAA investigations into Auburn and Missouri turned up little in the way of hard evidence beyond impermissible phone calls. The same appears to be true at Oklahoma.

The friendly media: Only one newspaper in the state, the Oklahoman, has the manpower to cover this NCAA investigation. The Oklahoman is owned by the Gaylord family. The Sooners play football at Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. Same Gaylords. The NCAA's allegations against Oklahoma are similar to the ones uncovered last year at Missouri. The media grilled Missouri. Oklahoma? Barely a peep.

The unimpeachable coach: Like Ohio State's Jim O'Brien before he was fired last summer, Oklahoma's Kelvin Sampson has been untouchable. He is a former president of the National Association of Basketball Coaches. In his tenure as president, with his profession reeling from the misdeeds at Baylor, Georgia and St. Bonaventure, the NABC created the Ethics Committee. According to the NCAA's investigation, Sampson made more than 200 of the impermissible calls.

The gray rulebook: In fairness to the OU coaching staff, the NCAA rule on phone calls -- "one per week" -- isn't exactly clear. For example, suppose Sampson calls Bookout and gets the mother instead. They speak for 45 seconds, and the mother asks Sampson to call back later. Sampson calls back and Bookout's dad answers. Again, no Bookout. Call back, Coach. Finally, Sampson finds Bookout. According to NCAA rules, that's three phone calls. Technically, though, Sampson and Kevin Bookout have spoken just once. Only the NCAA rulebook could be so thick, yet so incomplete.

The scapegoat: Like Missouri did with assistants Lane Odom and Tony Harvey, and like Ohio State has tried to do with Paul Biancardi, the best way for Oklahoma and Sampson to protect themselves from the NCAA's wrath is to blame Lopes, whose misconduct has been tied to two universities. But there are two problems. One, Sampson and Lopes are close friends. Two, Sampson is alleged to have made more than 200 of those calls himself, and the NCAA has accused him of not adequately monitoring his staff. That's why the Oklahoma violations have been deemed major.

Not to bring up old stuff, but I googled on this and it just reminded me of what a hack doyel was. For him highlight OU getting Taylor and Godbold as evidence that OU was cheating is laughable. Taylor's biggest offer was Tulsa and a late offer by OSU. Godbold was set to either go to Missouri State or Walkon to OU when Kelvin offered him a scholarship. Also if you look at Athletes first as a whole, OU offered Sheldon Williams, Azubuike, Jackson, Giddens, and Muenelo, all top talent and 4 NBA players. The best players pre Blake that OU got were Keith Clark, Bookout, and DeAngelo Alexander, good players, but hardly the caliber of the other players that AF had. It's funny because I use to listen the OSU guru Greg Swaim on the radio in 2000, 2001, and 2002, and this article is nearly verbatim of his anti-OU propaganda. I remember him having Doyel on the air the week before this article was printed and telling him all this stuff. Alot of people, including Sampson believe that Sean Sutton was the whistle blower. Funny how things turn out though.
 
Doyel was getting his info from Swaim. I remember this like it was yesterday. He was even on Swaim's show a couple of times and Swaim was feeding him all kinds of BS and lies about OU.
Doyel was called out by some Oklahoma media finally. John Rohde lit into him on WWLS calling him Swaim's little girl and other stuff.

You don't hear to much from Doyel anymore. And you damn sure don't hear anything from Swaim anymore. Swaim's career has gone down the toilet.
 
You don't hear to much from Doyel anymore. And you damn sure don't hear anything from Swaim anymore. Swaim's career has gone down the toilet.



yeah, your right. I heard Doyel on Jim Rome right before the tournament a couple of times as he was kissin Rome's butt throughout the interview. He tried to bag on Pat Knight, calling him a lampshade or something stupid. Swaim was ran off by Robert Allen because he started dogging Sean Sutton after Sutton took his press pass. He has a little radio show once a week that he does for CoachesAid.com and I saw him on the Kentucky and KU boards trying to drum up listeners when he had Matt Clark on to give "insight" on the Orton and Henry situation.
 
I've never like Doyel. You're right, he's a tool.
 
Doyel was getting his info from Swaim. I remember this like it was yesterday. He was even on Swaim's show a couple of times and Swaim was feeding him all kinds of BS and lies about OU.
Doyel was called out by some Oklahoma media finally. John Rohde lit into him on WWLS calling him Swaim's little girl and other stuff.

You don't hear to much from Doyel anymore. And you damn sure don't hear anything from Swaim anymore. Swaim's career has gone down the toilet.

This!
 
Doyel has found his way back to the middle. he was CNN/SI's lead hoops writer a few years ago. Now, you almost never see his stuff.

he's a doofus. had wrote some decent stuff when he played it straight ahead....but he got caught up in putting his own "wacky irreverence" into his columns it burned him in the end.
 
Oklahoma's Kelvin Sampson has been untouchable. He is a former president of the National Association of Basketball Coaches. In his tenure as president, with his profession reeling from the misdeeds at Baylor, Georgia and St. Bonaventure, the NABC created the Ethics Committee. According to the NCAA's investigation, Sampson made more than 200 of the impermissible calls.

the best way for Oklahoma and Sampson to protect themselves from the NCAA's wrath is to blame Lopes, whose misconduct has been tied to two universities. But there are two problems. One, Sampson and Lopes are close friends. Two, Sampson is alleged to have made more than 200 of those calls himself, and the NCAA has accused him of not adequately monitoring his staff. That's why the Oklahoma violations have been deemed major.
Looking back on it, that was all baloney. The part about Kelvin not adequately monitoring his staff is total nonsense. IMO, Kelvin and Ray got caught up in a CONSPIRACY and the media was part of it.
 
Looking back on it, that was all baloney. The part about Kelvin not adequately monitoring his staff is total nonsense. IMO, Kelvin and Ray got caught up in a CONSPIRACY and the media was part of it.

The sad part about the whole Kelvin thing is that was his way to battle some of the deficiencies that OU has as a program. He didn't have a midnight madness to fall back on, he didn't have guys going pro to point at, and He didn't have packed stadiums that wooed recruits. Add to that, his style was not a very recruit friendly style nor did he have young energetic assistants to relate to young recruits. All he had was the university, and a football weekend to create a fan friendly atmosphere.

I may be bias, but I never thought of the phone call situation as a way to get an advantage. As a matter of fact, OU didn't get any high profile recruits because of it or any recruits that they couldn't have gotten without calling them excessively. I really think his punishment and his current legacy is unjust, especially when you see the blatant things that a Tim Floyd and Jim Calhoun have done with no scars to their reputations.
 
I really think his punishment and his current legacy is unjust, especially when you see the blatant things that a Tim Floyd and Jim Calhoun have done with no scars to their reputations.
I agree. What happened to Kelvin at OU and Indiana is a travesty. For some reason, the NCAA had it in for Kelvin. Maybe he ticked off the wrong person on the ethics committee. IMO, the stringent guidelines placed on Kelvin at IU were designed for him to fail. Even if the accusations about Kelvin were true, excessively talking to a recruit does not give a coach an unfair advantage over his peers.
 
I agree. What happened to Kelvin at OU and Indiana is a travesty. For some reason, the NCAA had it in for Kelvin. Maybe he ticked off the wrong person on the ethics committee. IMO, the stringent guidelines placed on Kelvin at IU were designed for him to fail. Even if the accusations about Kelvin were true, excessively talking to a recruit does not give a coach an unfair advantage over his peers.

Kelvin did something with an easy paper trail....the phone records. So this allowed the NCAA to show it is an aggressive enforcer of rules. The reality is if you are going to cheat you can get away with it if you are smart and have somebody not associated with the school do it.
 
Kelvin did something with an easy paper trail....the phone records. So this allowed the NCAA to show it is an aggressive enforcer of rules. The reality is if you are going to cheat you can get away with it if you are smart and have somebody not associated with the school do it.

You're right, and that's the sad part about it. If you ask me if he knew it was illegal, I would have to say yes. I think he honestly thought that the issue wouldn't be worth investigating. People who intentionally cheat do it through people that make it hard to trace it back to them.
 
The sad part about the whole Kelvin thing is that was his way to battle some of the deficiencies that OU has as a program. He didn't have a midnight madness to fall back on, he didn't have guys going pro to point at, and He didn't have packed stadiums that wooed recruits. Add to that, his style was not a very recruit friendly style nor did he have young energetic assistants to relate to young recruits. All he had was the university, and a football weekend to create a fan friendly atmosphere.

I agree & that's why I think what Coach Capel is doing is all that much more impressive and why I'm glad he's the Coach and not Sampson.
 
The weird thing was I think he used to actually write favorably about OU and even Sampson. Something must have happened but he really ran with all that info that seemed to be just the same crap Swaim was saying. Also remember Godbold only got a scholarship once Rae Carruth was booted.
 
I believe it was BBJ and Doyel that really got after each other on the radio
 
I believe it was BBJ and Doyel that really got after each other on the radio
Yes, I remember hearing that while in my car one day. I almost drove off the road laughing. I think Doyel ended up calling back in and apologizing.
 
Here's a Blog by someone named Alex on Doyel:


http://www.insidethehall.com/2009/0...dress-calipari-to-kentucky-until-i-read-this/

College basketball as you know it? It’s over. That sport doesn’t exist anymore, because that sport had a semblance of parity. One year North Carolina is the dominant program. One year it’s UConn. One year it’s Duke or UCLA or Florida. Maybe those teams don’t win the national title the year they’re dominant, or maybe they do. Either way, every year there is a team that, on paper, is the dominant program in college basketball. And every year it’s a different team.

Until now. Until John Calipari merges with Kentucky.

Don’t get me wrong. I think Calipari will be great at Kentucky. Do I think he’ll win a title? It’s probably a good bet. Multiple titles? Not out of the realm of possibility, either.

What I don’t believe is that college basketball as we currently know it is over because John Calipari is reportedly the new coach at UK. Maybe I missed something, but Roy Williams is still loading up at North Carolina, Rick Pitino is still in charge at Louisville, Tom Izzo is still getting to the Final Four in East Lansing and Tom Crean is just getting started in Bloomington.

Sure, it’s a scary thought when you combine a top-notch recruiter like Calipari with the facilities, fanbase and tradition that exist in Lexington. If Calipari keeps his nose out of the dirt and wins big, it’s a match made in heaven. The hunger to win for a rabid fanbase that hasn’t been to a Final Four since 1998 will be satisfied.

But there’s also the other side of the coin: awful graduation rates, a possible lack of discipline, a vacated Final Four appearance at UMass and of course, William Wesley. So before we go anointing a dynasty in Lexington, let’s let this all play out … shall we, Mr. Doyel?
 
http://www.cbssports.com/columns/story/9573738

Oklahoma City Sonics? Hornets? Not gonna happen
July 27, 2006
By Gregg Doyel
CBS SportsLine.com National Columnist




NBA groupie Oklahoma City will get its heart broken by the SuperSonics and Hornets, and the only people who don't know it are those who live in Oklahoma City.

At the moment Oklahoma City looks good for an NBA franchise by 2008, whether it's the Hornets, who adopted OKC as a second home after Hurricane Katrina leveled New Orleans, or the Sonics, who were purchased last week by an OKC group.




Well, looks deceive. So do professional franchises and owners and leagues, all of whom use one city against another. In this scenario OKC is the city that's going to get used. With history for bifocals, you can see Oklahoma City's depressing destiny from a long way off. The innocent folks of OKC? They can't see anything. They're too close to the situation, too involved, blinded by lust.

Charlotte knows that lust. So do Tampa Bay and Washington, D.C.

Oklahoma City boosters will tell you they're different than jilted cities of the past. That they're close, so close, to getting an NBA team. The Hornets look good, considering New Orleans didn't support the team before the hurricane and can't support it now, and considering OKC fans bought more than 10,000 season tickets when the Hornets hastily moved there this past season. The Sonics look even better, considering their new ownership is led by an OKC businessman, Clay Bennett, who has been trying for years to bring home a major sports franchise.

One way or another, the NBA is coming to Oklahoma City. That's what OKC boosters believe. Last week Oklahoman columnist Berry Tramel wrote, "OKC suddenly has two quarterhorses in the derby, and its permanent NBA chances never have been better. Hornets or Sonics, one or the other, almost surely will be Ford Center tenants beyond next season."

Given what you know about the situation in New Orleans and the ownership in Seattle, that sounds reasonable. Almost surely the NBA is coming to Oklahoma City.


Then again ... when it comes to a city's pursuit of a sports franchise, "almost surely" will almost always get your heart broken.

Look at Tampa Bay. Yes, Tampa Bay got its Major League Baseball team, but don't forget the torture it endured before winning the expansion Devil Rays.

When Tampa Bay investors agreed to buy the Minnesota Twins in 1984, commissioner Bowie Kuhn nixed the deal. In 1985, Tampa Bay investors agreed to buy the Oakland A's for $37 million; Oakland backed out of the deal. In 1987, Tampa Bay went after the Twins again, agreeing to buy the team for $65 million. That deal crumbled during further negotiations. In 1988, the Chicago White Sox came so close to moving to Tampa Bay that team employees were polled to see who would move South with the team. Although 60 percent said they'd move, the White Sox stayed put.

There's more.

Along the way, St. Petersburg built a $130 million stadium to turn its annual MLB flirtation into marriage, with 22,000 season tickets spoken for. In 1991, baseball rewarded Tampa Bay diligence by giving an expansion franchise to ... Miami. In 1992, St. Pete tried to buy the Seattle Mariners, but the Marlins helped throttle that by citing their need for in-state exclusivity. Later in 1992, San Francisco owner Bob Lurie agreed to sell the Giants to a Tampa Bay group, but NL owners veoted the deal.

This could be you, Oklahoma City.

You also could be Washington, D.C., which lost its MLB franchise in 1971 and spent 34 years trying to get one back. In 1973, a D.C. group agreed to buy the San Diego Padres, even choosing Frank Robinson (strange but true) as the team's next manager, but had to give the franchise back after failing to close the deal in three weeks. In 1976, baseball expanded not to the nation's capital, but to Toronto and Seattle. In 1991, with Washington, D.C., again on the list, baseball grew to Miami and Denver.


In February 1995, Major League Baseball described Washington, D.C., as "a very viable candidate for expansion." Two weeks later MLB awarded teams to Tampa Bay and Phoenix. Later that year, a Washington, D.C., group agreed to buy the Houston Astros for roughly $150 million, only to have commissioner Bud Selig squash the deal.

If you're NBA groupie Oklahoma City, you're comforted that Tampa did finally get its expansion team, and Washington, D.C., did finally get the Expos. But compare those cities to OKC. No comparison, know what I mean? The sunny Tampa Bay market beats the crap out of dusty OKC. Washington, D.C., is one of the leading cities in the world, while Oklahoma City is one of the leading cities in Oklahoma.

So what'll get between NBA groupie Oklahoma City and its NBA team? No clue, but it'll be something. The Hornets and Sonics have several years left on current leases, which give their cities time on arena and infrastructure issues. The NBA could decide not to let either franchise leave its internationally known city for OKC, which would be the smallest, least diverse market in the league. Boll weevils could destroy downtown OKC.

This is not a painless process. Charlotte knows. Charlotte has been linked to almost every small-market franchise in baseball, with Minnesota Gov. Arne Carlson once glumly predicting the Twins would become the Charlotte Twins. Didn't happen. Charlotte got so abused by baseball that earlier this year, when the Marlins announced plans to explore other cities and mentioned Charlotte, Charlotte basically said not to bother.

Charlotte has read this book, many times, and knows how the story ends. Could someone please send the book to Oklahoma City? Oklahoma City only knows what NBA owners are telling it.

Which means Oklahoma City doesn't know anything.

img9573921.jpg


New owner Clay Bennett is Oklahoma's native son, but will likely keep the Sonics in Washington. (AP)
 
I believe it was BBJ and Doyel that really got after each other on the radio

Yep.
Another one was Rohde. He came on the WWLS and AL & someone else had been talking about one of the stupid Doyel articles.
They asked Rohde if he had read it and Rohde said "Swaim's article?".
Al said no, "Doyel's?".
Rohde says "Who? same difference".

It was pretty amusing.
But BBJ did get after him pretty good.
 
Not sure what the reason was to bring this up again.

Doyel may be a goober, but Kelvin was a cheater.

Period.
 
I also found the "friendly media" comment laughable. Consider that Saint Eddie was still riding high in Stillwater and got all the suck-ups the media had to offer for men's basketball in the state. Any praise that Kelvin and his kids ever got was pretty slim compared to the gushing that Eddie and his bunch always got.
 
Back
Top